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Naysayer papers

Naysayer papers
Naysayer papers
Naysayer/denier articles and reports spend valuable print space suggesting that disease from mold can only occur after ingestion, or can only occur in the presence of large amounts of aerosolized toxin, or can only occur in an acute exposure.  All of those writings are part of their misinformation ("Big Lie") strategy.

In light of the overwhelming peer-reviewed and journal-published evidence to the contrary, it is unimaginable that such papers are still being inked, are still being used in courts as “evidence” and are still considered relevant in any way.

Many of the naysayer/denier papers, articles and presentations are listed in the following table. If you are looking for copies of these items, please Contact Us.

AAAAI 2006 (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)

AACT (American Academy of Clinical Toxicology) and ACMT (American College of Medical Toxicology)

ACMT (American College of Medical Toxicology)

ACOEM 2002 (American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine)

ACOEM 2011 (American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine)

AIHA (American Institute of Industrial Hygienists)





AOEC (Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics)


Assouline-Dayan, Yehudith
Leong, Albin
Shoenfeld, Yehuda
Gershwin, M. Eric

ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry)




Bardana, Emil J. Jr.
Montanaro, A.
O'Hollaren, M.T.

Bardana, Emil J. Jr.
Chapman, Jean A. 
Charlesworth, Ernest N. 
Jacobs, Robert L. 
Terr, Abba I.

Bardana, Emil J.



Bardana, Emil J.









Bardana, Emil J.



Barrett, Stephen J.
Gots, Ronald E.

Barrett, Stephen J.


Burge, Harriet A.








Burge, Harriet A.


Burge, Harriet A.


Bush, Robert K.
Portnoy, Jay M. 
Saxon, Andrew 
Terr, Abba I. 
Wood, Robert A.

CDC (U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)












Chang, Christopher M.
Gershwin, M. Eric

Chang, Christopher M.
Gershwin, M. Eric

Chapman, Jean A.
Terr, Abba I.
Jacobs, Robert L.
Charlesworth, Ernest N.
Bardana, Emil J.

FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Association)












Fisher, Daniel



Golden, David


Gots, Ronald E.









Gots, Ronald E.



Gots, Ronald E


Gots, Ronald E.
Clark, Geneva L.
Franklin, Donald E.

Gots, Ronald E.
Pirages, Suellen W.
Gots, Barbara A.
Nealley, Mark

Gots, Ronald E.



Gots, Ronald E.


Gots, Ronald E.




Gots, Ronald E.
Layton N.J.
Pirages, Suellen W.

Gots, Ronald E.


Gots, Ronald E.




Gots, Ronald E.



Gots, Ronald E.


Gots, Ronald E.
Pirages, Suellen W.

Gots, Ronald E.
Pirages, Suellen W.

Gots, Ronald E.


Gots, Ronald E.



Gots, Ronald E.








Gots, Ronald E.

Gots, Ronald E.
Pirages, SuellenW.


Gots, Ronald E.
Pirages, Suellen W.






Gots, Ronald E.
Gots, Barbara A. 
Spencer, J.

Guidotti, Tee L.











Harbison, Raymond D.
Hillman, James V.

Harbison, Raymond D.
Stedeford, Todd
Banasik, Marek
Muro-Cacho, Carlos A.

Hardin, Bryan D.
Saxon, Andrew
Robbins, Coreen
Kelman, Bruce J.



Hardin, Bryan D. 
Kelman, Bruce J. 
Saxon, Andrew 







Hardin, Bryan D.
Kelman, Bruce J.
Saxon, Andrew












Hardin, Bryan D.





Hardin, Bryan D.
Robbins, Coreen A.
Fallah, Payam
Kelman, Bruce J.

Hays, Steve M.








Hutchinson, Cliff
Powell, Robert









Institute of Medicine (IOM)
























Kelman, Bruce J.
Robbins, Coreen A
Swenson, Lonie J. 

Kelman, Bruce J.
Robbins, Coreen A.
Swenson, Lonie J.
Hardin, Bryan D.

Khalili, Barzin
Montanaro, MT
Bardana, Emil J. 

Khan, Farah





King, Blair





King, Norman
Auger, Pierre

Kirkland, Kimberly H.


Kuhn, D.M.
Ghannoum, M.A.


Kung’u, Jackson





LaBar, Gregg



Lee, Dwight R.



Lees-Haley, Paul R.



Lees-Haley, Paul R.
Brown R.S.

Lees-Haley, Paul R.




Lees-Haley, Paul R.



Lees-Haley, Paul R.



Lees-Haley, Paul R.











Lees-Haley, Paul R.



Lees-Haley, Paul R.
Williams, C.W.
English, L.T.

Lees-Haley, Paul R.


Light, Ed N.







Light, Ed N.









Metropolitan Corporate Counsel publication (about Ronald E. Gots)


Millar, J. Donald









Miller, J. David
Rand, Thomas G.
Jarvis, Bruce B.

National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)





NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences)











NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health)









O’Reilly, James T.
Hagan, Philip
Gots, Ronald
Hedge, Alan

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Page, Elena H.
Trout, Douglas B.








Page, Elena H.
Trout, Douglas B.

Payne, James D.

Pettigrew, H. David
Selmi, Carlo F.
Teuber, Suzanne S.
Gershwin, M. Eric

Richardson, Kelly G.




Richardson, Kelly G.




Richardson, Kelly G.





Richardson, Kelly G.




Robbins, Coreen A.
Swenson, Lonie J.
Nealley, Mark L.
Gots, Ronald E.
Kelman, Bruce J.

Schoenburg, Patrick S.




Sepkowitz, Kent







Sudakin, Daniel L.
Kurt, Thomas






Sudakin, Daniel L.


Sudakin, Daniel L.



Terr, Abba I.



Terr, Abba I.


Truex, Bruce A.



U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Institute for Legal Reform and the Center for Legal Policy at The Manhattan Institute




























Verhoeff, Arnoud P.
Burge, Harriet A.


Weiner, Howard M.
Gots, Ronald E.
Hein, Robert P.

Williams, C.W.
Lees-Haley, Paul R.


Wood, Robert A.









Zalma, Barry


Zalma, Barry


Zalma, Barry
 
See the listing under Bush, Robert K.
 
 
Ten Things Physicians and Patients Should Question (article for ChoosingWisely.org, September 26, 2013, 1-5 and March 26-2015, 6-10)
 
See the listing under Sudakin, Daniel L.
 
See the listing under Hardin, Bryan D.
 
 
See the listing under Hardin, Bryan D.
 
 
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC): Criteria for New Construction – White Paper 
Sponsored by the AIHA Construction and Toxicology Committees, and Green Building Working Group (acknowledgments given to several naysayers including Coreen A. Robbins)
 
The AOEC sponsored a workshop on December 11-12, 2003, at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, to discuss “Management of Mold-Exposed Individuals.”
 
Studies of Sick Building Syndrome. IV. Mycotoxicosis (Journal of Asthma, 2002, 39(3), 191-201)
 
 
 
ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Triggers of Asthma (Original date: November 28, 2014)
 
The ATSDR is an agency within HHS--the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
 
Building-Related Illness: A Review of Available Scientific Data (Clinical Reviews of Allergy, Vol. 6, 1988, Issue 1, pp. 61-89)
 
Crossing Over to the Dark Side of the Mold Issue: A Dissenting View (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Aug; 91(2):212-3; author reply 213-5) NO COPY of abstract or paper
 
 
Indoor Air Quality and Health. Does Fungal Contamination Play a Significant Role? (Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2003 May; 23(2):291-309)
 
Indoor Air Allergens and Irritants: With Emphasis on Molds in the Assessment of Indoor Quality Complaints (presentation) 
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Sick Building Syndrome: A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing (Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, Vol. 79, Number 3, September 1997)
 
Chemical Sensitivity: The Truth about Environmental Illness (April 1, 1998)--book
 
Some Notes on the Overdiagnosis of “Toxic Mold” Disease (article posted on Quackwatch.org on September 23, 2006)
 
The Fungi: How They Grow and Their Effects on Human Health
 
A primer on how fungi are formed, how they spread in buildings, and how individuals react through allergy symptoms, irritation, and toxicoses due to exposure (HPAC Interactive Engineering; Indoor Air Quality-IAQ-and Noise, July 1997)
 
Fungi: Toxic Killers or Unavoidable Nuisances? (Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, 87, 52-56)
 
Health Effects of Biological Contaminants (Indoor Air and Human Health, Chapter 10, CRC Press, 1996; 171-178)--book
 
The Medical Effects of Mold Exposure
American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) position statement on mold (2006)
 
 
 
State of the Science on Molds and Human Health (CDC paper presented by Stephen C. Redd to the U.S. Congress on July 18, 2002) 
 
The IOM 2004 report was commissioned by the CDC. 
 
NIOSH, a division of the CDC, issued a paper in 2012 that says mold only causes respiratory problems (see NIOSH below).
 
AOEC and PEHSU are funded by NIOSH and ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry—an agency for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 
 
Indoor Air Quality and Human Health: Truth vs Mass Hysteria (Clin Rev Allergy Immunol, 2004 Dec; 27(3): 219-239)
 
Mold Hysteria: Origin of the Hoax (Clinical & Developmental Immunology, June 2005, 12(2): 151-158)
 
Toxic Mold: Phantom Risk vs Science (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2003 Sep; 91(3):222-32)
 
 
 
 
Mold & Mildew: Cleaning Up Your Flood-Damaged Home (2007). They had some good information in this report, but they now have only limited information on their website under the following heading:
 
Dealing with Mold and Mildew in Your Flood-Damaged Home (last updated May 19, 2016). It is just 2 sentences and a list of six potential causes of water damage. Then they refer the public to the EPA and CDC websites for more information on cleanup, remediation and health hazards.
 
FEMA is an agency under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). 
 
Dr. Mold: The science may be sketchy, but medical experts…keep litigation alive and kicking (article for Forbes, April 11, 2005)
 
Three Years Later, Industry Puts Toxic Mold into Perspective (Insurance Journal, February 9, 2004)
 
Correcting Mold Misinformation (notes from his presentation)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Differential Diagnosis versus Causation (dritoday blog, January 21, 2010)—article by Gots
 
Differential Diagnosis versus Causation Assessment: Why they are separate methodologies and how they relate to Daubert (2004, users.physics.harvard.edu)
 
Differential Diagnosis vs Causal Assessment: Relevance to Daubert
 
 
Essential Steps in Managing School Indoor Air Crises (2002)—article by Gots, et al
 
 
 
From Symptoms to Liability: The Distinct Roles of Differential Diagnosis and Causation Assessment (article in For the Defense, July 2005, pages 24-30)
 
Give Your Building an Air Check (Primacentral.org, August 2001)—article by Gots
 
Indoor Air and Health: Clear Cut, Equivocal and Unlikely (Chapter 4 of Keeping Buildings Healthy: How to Monitor and Prevent Indoor Environmental Problems, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2002)
 
Indoor Health: Background Levels of Fungi (AIHA Journal, 2003 July-Aug; 64(4):427-38)
 
 
Indoor Health Problems: A Sound Process for Resolution (December 3, 2001)—article by Gots
 
Investigating Health Complaints (Chapter 3 of 
Keeping Buildings Healthy: How to Monitor and Prevent Indoor Environmental Problems, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2002)
 
Mold and Health Tips: How Medical Statements by Mold Testers Can Get You in Trouble (2002)—article by Gots
 
Mold and Mold Toxins: The Newest Toxic Tort (Journal of Controversial Medical Claims, Vol. 8, No. 1, February 2001)—article by Gots
 
Mold as Toxins (Columns, Mold 1:6-7, 5859. 2002) 
 
 
Mold as Toxin (Perspectives, Mold. March 2002)
 
 
Mold Claims (tips for attorneys in mold cases)—document written by Gots
 
Mold Claims: Recognizing What is Real and Dealing with the Current Excessive Fears and Claims (October 1, 2002)—article by Gots
 
Mold Medicine versus Mold Hype (presentation)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Mold Misinformation (2002)
 
Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: Psychogenic or Toxicodynamic Origins (Int J Toxicol 18:393-400, 1999)--abstract
 
OSHA Proposed Rule for Indoor Air Quality
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Proving Causes of Illness in Environmental Toxicology: ‘Sick Buildings’ as an Example. (Fresenius Envir Bull 1 (1992): 135-42)
 
President of ACOEM (when the ACOEM 2002 mold paper was released). 
 
In response to the January 9, 2007, Wall Street Journal article titled “Amid Suits Over Mold, Experts Wear Two Hats,” Guidotti issued a press released defending the ACOEM 2002 mold paper. The press release was titled “Ambush Above the Fold: ACOEM Response to Recent Mold Issue.” 
 
See the listing for the ACOEM 2002 paper under Hardin, Bryan D.
 
Evaluation of Mold-Induced Adverse Health Effects (article for Harris Martin’s Columns, January 2004; Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 6-7, 59-61)
 
Toxicology and Risk Assessment of Mycotoxins (Journal of Land Use, Mycotoxins: Mechanisms, Vol. 19:2, pp. 451-463) 
 
 
A Scientific View of the Health Effects of Mold (July 17, 2003)
 
This paper was commissioned by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform and the Center for Legal Policy at The Manhattan Institute (see below under U.S. Chamber of Commerce)
 
Adverse Human Health Effects Associated with Molds in the Indoor Environment 
 
Known as the ACOEM 2002 position statement on mold.
 
Written by Hardin, Kelman and Saxon “under the auspices of the ACOEM Council on Scientific Affairs. It was peer-reviewed by the Council and its committees, and was approved by the ACOEM Board of Directors on October 27, 2002.”
 
Adverse Human Health Effects Associated with Molds in the Indoor Environment 
 
Known as the ACOEM 2011 position statement on mold. They quietly removed it from their website in early 2015.
 
The ACOEM 2011 position statement was "prepared under the auspices of the Council of Scientific Advisors and approved by the ACOEM Board of Directors on February 14, 2011. This revised statement updates the previous (2002) position statement which was prepared by Bryan D. Hardin, PhD; Bruce J. Kelman, PhD, DABT; and Andrew Saxon, MD; under the auspices of the ACOEM Council on Scientific Affairs."
 
Recently Published Evaluations of the Association of Mycotoxins and Health Effects in Indoor Environments (presentation), American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Conference & Exposition, June 2-7, 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
 
The Concentration of No Toxicologic Concern (CoNTC) and Airborne Mycotoxins (Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 72: 585-598, 2009)
 
The Science and Art of Environmental Mold Investigations (presentation)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
A New Plague – Mold Litigation: How Junk Science and Hysteria Built an Industry
 
Written by attorneys Cliff Hutchinson and Robert Powell (July 17, 2003)
 
This paper was commissioned by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform and the Center for Legal Policy at The Manhattan Institute (see below under U.S. Chamber of Commerce)
 
Damp Indoor Spaces and Health (Committee on Damp Indoor Spaces and Health, The National Academies Press, 2004, 370 pages)
 
The 2004 IOM paper (and the 2009 WHO paper) omitted several key research papers from their list of references. To see a list of some of the papers that were omitted, go to our website. 
 
Prior to this 2004 report, the IOM published two papers on the topic of asthma and indoor air exposures, as follows:
 
Indoor Allergens: Assessing and Controlling Adverse Health Effects (The National Academies Press, 1993, 321 pages, edited by Andrew M. Pope, Roy Patterson and Harriet Burge)
 
Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures (The National Academies Press, 2000, 457 pages, the committee included Richard B. Johnston, Jr., Harriet A. Burge and 10 others )
 
These two papers laid some of the groundwork leading into their 2004 paper.
 
Evaluation of Potential Health Effects from Inhalation Exposure to Mycotoxins in Indoor Office and Residential Environments (Toxicological Sciences, 2002, 66:267)
 
Risk from Inhaled Mycotoxins in Indoor Office and Residential Environments (International Journal of Toxicology, 23(1):3-10, January 2004)
 
 
Inhalational Mold Toxicity: Fact or Fiction? A Clinical Review of 50 Cases (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 Sep; 95(3):239-46)
 
Why Is the Internet So Obsessed with Toxic Mold? (article by Dr. Farah Khan) 
 
 
The Truth About ‘Toxic Molds’ (article for Huffington Post, posted 11/04/2015 and updated 11/04/2016)
 
 
Indoor Air Quality, Fungi and Health. How do we stand? (Can Fam Physician, 2002; 48: 298-302)
 
Health Hazards from Exposure to Mycotoxic Fungi in Indoor Environments (The Synergist, April 2001)
 
Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective (Clinical Microbiology Reviews, Jan. 2003, Vol. 16. No. 1, p. 144-172)
 
Mold Exposure at Home and the Workplace (article by Dr. Jackson Kung’u)
 
 
Putting Indoor Air Quality in its Place (Occupational Hazards, October 1992)— opinions of naysayers Ronald Gots and Edward Sowinski
 
The Next Environmental Battleground: Indoor Air (National Center for Policy Analysis, NCPA Policy Report No. 174, ISBN 0-943802-78-4, November 1992)
 
Attorneys Influence Expert Evidence in Forensic Psychological Cases (Sage Journals, Assessment, 4, 321-324, published December 1, 1997)
 
Biases in Perception and Reporting Following a Perceived Toxic Exposure (Percept Mot Skills 1992 Oct; 75(2): 531-44)
 
Commentary on Neuropsychological Performance of Patients Following Mold Exposure (includes a Thank You to Dr. Dan Sudakin, Dr. Ron Gots, Dr. Bruce Kelman and Dr. Don Millar)
 
Malingering Mental Disorder on the SCL-90R: Toxic Exposure and Cancerphobia (Psychological Reports, 1989, 65, 1203-1208)
 
Malingering Traumatic Mental Disorders on the Beck Depression Inventory: Cancerphobia and Toxic Exposure (Psychological Reports, 1989, 65, 623-626)
 
Mold Neurotoxicity: Validity, Reliability and Baloney (Posted on Quackwatch.com at https://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/toxicmold.html)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Neuropsychological Complaint Base Rates of 170 Personal Injury Claimants (Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 8, pp. 203-209, 1993)
 
Response Bias in Self-Reported History of Plaintiffs Compared with Nonlitigating Patients (Psychological Reports, 1996, 79, 811-818)
 
Toxic Mold and Mycotoxins in Neurotoxicity Cases (Journal of Controversial Medical Claims, Vol. 11, No. 2, May 2004)
 
Mold Remediation: How Complex Should it Be? 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Mold Remediation: How Complex Should it Be? --presentation 
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
An Expert Who Has Been There—Dr. Ronald E. Gots (Metropolitan Corporate Counsel, April 1, 2005)--article about Ronald E. Gots
 
Mold and Human Illness: One Epidemiologist’s View (presentation)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
Stachybotrys chartarum: Cause of Human Disease or Media Darling? (Medical Mycology, 2003; 41: 271-291)
 
 
Scientific Literature Review of Mold: A Report on the Health Effects of Indoor Mold (September 2003)
 
Review panel members: Scott D. Phillips, Wendell Rahorst, William F. Schoenwetter, Wayne R. Thomann
 
NIEHS is a division of the NIH (National Institutes of Health), which is a part of the U.S. Health and Human Services agency.
 
On the NIEHS website, they say that “inhalation is considered the primary way that people are exposed to mold,” but “molds are generally not harmful to health humans.” 
 
So, they admit that inhalation is the primary route of these exposures, but then they say that molds are generally not harmful.
 
NIOSH Alert, Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease from Exposures Caused by Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings (November 2012, Publication No. 2013-102)
 
In this report from NIOSH, they still address only the respiratory effects of mold.
 
NIOSH is a division of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
 
Keeping Buildings Healthy: How to Monitor and Prevent Indoor Environmental Problems (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2002, this book has two chapters written by Ronald Gots, see above under his name)
 
A Brief Guide to Mold in the Workplace (updated on November 8, 2013)
 
The Role of Mycotoxins in Building-Related Illness (2002 presentation)
 
Conference on Mold Medicine & Mold Science: Its Practical Applications for Patient Care, Remediation & Claims, May 13-14, 2002, Georgetown University Convention Center, Washington, D.C., Sponsored by International Center for Toxicology and Medicine (ICTM) and the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University
 
The Role of Stachybotrys Mycotoxins in Building-Related Illness (AIHAJ 62:644-648, September/October 2001)
 
Texas Mold: The Litigation Gusher that Didn’t Hit, Yet (2003)
 
Mold and Human Health: Separating the Wheat from the Chaff (Clinic Rev Allerg Immunol, 2010, 38:148-155)
 
 
 
Debunking Some Toxic Mold Myths (2016)
 
 
The Truth About Toxic Mold (Part 1) 2016
 
 
The Truth Behind 13 Pervasive Myths on Mold (September 26, 2016)
 
 
What They Aren’t Telling You About Mold (Part 2) 2016 
 
 
Health Effects of Mycotoxins in Indoor Air: A Critical Review (Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 2000, 15, 773-784)
 
 
 
Analyzing Mold Claims from Medical and Scientific Perspectives: What Owners, Managers, Builders, and Their Attorneys Need to Know (Real Property Law, Reporter, January 2006, Volume 29, Number 1, pages 209-211
 
Hurricane Sandy Won’t Bring a Mold Epidemic – The paranoia about mold being left behind by the floods is unwarranted (article on thedailybeast.com, November 4, 2012)
 
 
American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT)
2006 Mold Position Statement
 
The ACMT concurs with the 2004 Institute of Medicine (IOM) paper titled “Damp Indoor Spaces and Health.”
 
Primary authors: Daniel Sudakin and Tom Kurt
 
Stachybotrys chartarum: Current Knowledge of its Role in Disease (Medscape General Medicine, 2000, February 29, 1-7)
 
Toxigenic Fungi in a Water-Damaged Building: An Intervention Study (American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 1998, 34, 183-190)

Are Indoor Molds Causing a New Disease? (Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Volume 113, Issue 2, February 2004, Pages 221–226)
 
Stachybotrys: Relevance to Human Disease (Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, 2001, 87, 57-63)
 
Mold Caused Neuropsychological Injuries: Fact or Fiction? (article by Bruce Truex with Secrest Wardle law firm, 2004, Vol. IV, No. 1)
 
The Growing Hazard of Mold Litigation (July 17, 2003)
 
"The U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform was founded in 1998 as a 501(c)(6) tax-exempt, separately incorporated affiliate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce."
 
Note: The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is not a government agency. It is merely a lobbying group for business.
 
"The U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform, partnering with the Center for Legal Policy of the Manhattan Institute, commissioned two papers that take a close look at mold litigation and the science of mold. The first, by Cliff Hutchinson and Robert Powell, two experienced litigators with Hughes and Luce in Dallas and Austin, provides a legal perspective on mold claims. The second, written by a team of scientists led by Dr. Bryan Hardin, former Deputy Director of NIOSH and former Assistant Surgeon General in the Public Health Service, addresses the scientific evidence."
 
These two papers are listed individually above (under Hutchinson and Hardin) and their titles are:
 
A New Plague – Mold Litigation: How Junk Science and Hysteria Built an Industry (by attorneys Cliff Hutchinson and Robert Powell)
and
A Scientific View of the Health Effects of Mold (written by Bryan D. Hardin, Andrew Saxon, Coreen Robbins and Bruce J. Kelman)
 
Health Risk Assessment of Fungi in Home Environments (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1997; 78:544-54) Supported by a grant from Zeneca Pharmaceuticals
 
Medical Causation and Expert Testimony: Allergists at this Intersection of Medicine and Law (Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2012; 12:590–598)
 
Perceived Toxic Exposure: A Review of Four Cognitive Influences on Perception of Illness (Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 1993, 8, 489-506)
 
Mold Growing in Flooded Basements or Other Damp Spots Can Cause Allergic Reactions (article in the Washington Post, January 14, 2013)
 
 
Insidious Mold Fraud (The White Paper, Vol. 17, No. 5, September/October 2003)
 
Mold and the Ballard/Allison Case (Spring 2003, Property Insurance Law Committee Newsletter, ABA, Tort and Insurance Practice Section)
 
Mold is Not Gold (VUpoint Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 4, Issue # 178, February 23, 2007 and Claims Magazine, March 2007)
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